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Off the Record

Social Media as the Next Judicial Frontier

Posted by on Jul 21, 2016

As the use of social media increases, its influence in the judicial system has greatly increased. As is to be expected with new technology, the issues brought about by social media are new and unique. (more…)

Former WWE Wrestlers Follow Lead of NFL Concussion Litigation

Posted by on Jan 28, 2015

I grew up watching Hulk Hogan, Macho Man Randy Savage, The Ultimate Warrior, Bam Bam Bigelow and the like wrestling at the Cow Palace in Daly City. Naturally, news about the injuries wrestlers may or may not have sustained while entertaining me, as a 9 year-old, got my attention. I never thought about how much of their “job” was about getting hurt (or at least looking like they were).

On January 16, 2015, two former World Wrestling Entertainment (“WWE”) wrestlers, Vito LoGrasso (aka “Big Vito” or “Skull Von Krush”) and Evan Singleton (aka “Adam Mercer”) filed a class action complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania for “egregious mistreatment of its wrestlers for its own benefit.” The allegations echo those alleged in the suits currently pending against the NFL and include six causes of action: (1) fraudulent concealment, (2) negligent misrepresentation, (3) negligence, (4) declaratory and injunctive relief, (5) medical monitoring and (6) strict liability for abnormally dangerous activities.

The suit alleges that the wrestling tricks performed (and required) by WWE wrestlers involved harmful striking of their heads. According to the former WWE wrestlers, they were encouraged and paid to get hurt. They claim that WWE failed to protect its wrestlers and deliberately heightened the violence of its matches in order to liven up audiences and increase profits.

Both wrestlers allege that they now suffer from traumatic head injuries which have led to migraines, memory loss, depression and deafness. The injuries, they claim, are the result of sustaining blows to the head from chairs, metal garbage cans, baseball bats and being thrown through tables during matches. According to the complaint, WWE concealed injuries and failed to disclose relevant medical literature to its clients leaving the wresters vulnerable to the impending risks.

For a copy of the complaint filed, click on the following: SINGLETON_et_al_v_WORLD_WRESTLING_ENTERTAINMENT__paedce-15-00223__0001.0

This document is intended to provide you with general information about legal developments. The contents of this document are not intended to provide specific legal advice. If you have questions about the contents of this alert, please contact Gemma Mondala at 415-697-2000 or at gmondala@aghwlaw.com. This communication may be considered advertising in some jurisdictions.

The Top 10 List of 2014’s Most Unbelievable Excuses for Calling in Sick

Posted by on Nov 2, 2014

Once a year, the website CareerBuilder releases the “Most Unbelievable Excuses for Calling in Sick,” a top ten list of the most questionable and creative excuses employees come up with to call in sick from work.surveys. The list is generated from a survey of 2,203 hiring managers and human resource professionals and 3,103 U.S. employees. In addition to the list, the survey reveals some interesting factoids and statistics about our nation’s workforce. For example:

  • Although 49% of employees say their employer provides them with a Paid Time Off (PTO) program that allows them to use their time off in any way they choose, only 23% of those employees still felt obligated to create an excuse to take the day off.
  • 31% of those employers surveyed admitted to checking to see if their employee was telling the truth when the employee called in sick (66% asked for a doctor’s note, 49% called the employee, and 15% literally drove past the employee’s house).
  • 53% of employees surveyed stated that they went into work even when sick because they felt that their work would not otherwise get completed.

To see the list of the most unbelievable excuses for calling in sick, click here.

This document is intended to provide you with general information about legal developments. The contents of this document are not intended to provide specific legal advice. If you have questions about the contents of this alert, please contact Hannibal Odisho at 415-697-3463 or at . This communication may be considered advertising in some jurisdictions.

Absurd Deposition Situations

Posted by on Sep 22, 2014

Nearly every attorney has experienced a surreal moment in a deposition where he/she thinks “did the witness really just say that?” We try to relay the experience to other people, later, but cannot always do it justice. For a little humor, enjoy …

What is a Photocopier?

(New York Times, 4/27/14)

This document is intended to provide you with general information about legal developments. The contents of this document are not intended to provide specific legal advice. If you have questions about the contents of this alert, please contact Kevin Allen at 415-697-3455 or at kallen@aghwlaw.com. This communication may be considered advertising in some jurisdictions.

Relying on Unreliable Facts

Posted by on Sep 22, 2014

During law school and your first few years of practice, a few things are drilled in about motion practice. Near the top? Check your facts and check your cites. You may not always  have the most persuasive argument, but you always want to have the most reliable one.

Well, even the U.S. Supreme Court makes a mistake now and again.

Seeking Facts, Justices Settle for What Briefs Tell Them

(New York Times, 9/1/14)

This document is intended to provide you with general information about legal developments. The contents of this document are not intended to provide specific legal advice. If you have questions about the contents of this alert, please contact Kevin Allen at 415-697-3455 or at kallen@aghwlaw.com. This communication may be considered advertising in some jurisdictions.